All our puppies will be Akc Registered unless otherwise stated.  They will have their tails docked, dew claws removed, and will have their 1st puppy shots, as well as multiple worming's before going to their new furever home's. 

All puppies will be given a 1 yr health guarantee. Meaning we guarantee they are free from any genetic health problems for up to 1 year from purchase.

Prices of Puppies:

Limited Akc Registration: This means you are not planning on breeding your puppy once their full grown, pet only.

Full Akc Registration:  This means that you intend on breeding your puppy once full grown.

Prices will vary depending on parentage, or background testing done.  Testing: DM, EIC, VWD1.
Puppies prices are:
Carrier (Not at risk) only puppies are:
                         $1000 Limited AKC Registration, or
                         $1200 for Full AKC Registration.

DM Clear only puppies are:

                        $1300 Limited AKC Registration, or

                        $1500 for Full AKC Registration.

DM Carrier (Not at risk), EIC Clear, VWD1 Clear puppies are:

                        $1200 for Limited AKC Registration, or

                        $1400 for Full AKC Registration.
DM Clear, EIC Clear, and VWD1 Clear puppies are:
                        $1500 Limited AKC Registration, or
                        $1800 for Full AKC Registration.


**Please be aware that Akc will not authorize a litter until a dog is  at least 9 months old. Your female puppy may go

'in heat' earlier than that, but you will not be able to register the litter.


A $200 non-refundable deposit is required to hold your puppy of interest.


If we do not have any puppies right now, ask to be placed on our 'Waiting List'  for our next litter. Just let us know what 

sex (Male or Female) and what color (Tri, Red/White, Sable) your looking for.  Once a litter is available and 

it's your turn on the waiting list to pick a puppy, you will be sent a notice that  it's your turn  to put a deposit on an available puppy.

Please note: If there are several available, then a message will be sent to the same number of people that puppies are available.  A puppy will not be held without a deposit being placed. 


Please Note: 
Puppies are considered 'Available' until a deposit is made for the puppy of interest.
Once your deposit is made, your name will appear on your puppy's picture.


​Please see the puppy contract for all the details.


DM - Degenerative Myelopathy

Degenerative Myelopathy caused by Mutation of the SOD1 gene is an inherited neurologic disorder of dogs. This mutation is found in many breeds of dog, including the Pembroke Welsh corgi. While it is not clear for some of the other breeds, Pembroke Welsh corgis are known to develop degenerative myelopathy associated with this mutation. The variable presentation between breeds suggests that there are environmental or other genetic factors responsible for modifying disease expression. The disease affects the White Matter tissue of the spinal cord and is considered the canine equivalent to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s disease) found in humans. Affected dogs usually present in adulthood with gradual muscle Atrophy and loss of coordination typically beginning in the hind limbs due to degeneration of the nerves. The condition is not typically painful for the dog, but will progress until the dog is no longer able to walk. The gait of dogs affected with degenerative myelopathy can be difficult to distinguish from the gait of dogs with hip dysplasia, arthritis of other joints of the hind limbs, or intervertebral disc disease. Late in the progression of disease, dogs may lose fecal and urinary continence and the forelimbs may be affected. Affected dogs may fully lose the ability to walk 6 months to 2 years after the onset of symptoms. Affected small breed dogs, such as the Pembroke Welsh corgi, often progress more slowly than affected large breed dogs and owners may postpone euthanasia until the dog is paraplegic.

Breed-Specific Information for the Pembroke Welsh Corgi

The Mutation of the SOD1 gene associated with degenerative myelopathy has been identified in the Pembroke Welsh corgi. The average age of onset for Pembroke Welsh corgis with degenerative myelopathy is approximately 11 years of age. The overall frequency of this disease is unreported in Pembroke Welsh corgis. However, in one study of 3209 Pembroke Welsh corgis tested, 28% were carriers of the mutation and 65.1% were at-risk/affected.

Testing Tips:
Genetic testing of the SOD1 gene in Pembroke Welsh corgis will reliably determine whether a dog is a genetic Carrier of degenerative myelopathy. Degenerative Myelopathy is inherited in an Autosomal Recessive manner in dogs meaning that they must receive two copies of the mutated gene (one from each parent) to develop the disease. In general, carrier dogs do not have features of the disease but when bred with another carrier of the same Mutation, there is a risk of having affected pups. Each pup that is born to this pairing has a 25% chance of inheriting the disease and a 50% chance of inheriting one copy and being a carrier of the SOD1 gene mutation. Reliable genetic testing is important for determining breeding practices. Because symptoms may not appear until adulthood and some at-risk/affected dogs do not develop the disease, genetic testing should be performed before breeding. Until the exact modifying environmental or genetic factor is determined, genetic testing remains the only reliable way to detect neurological disease associated with this mutation prior to death. In order to eliminate this mutation from breeding lines and to avoid the potential of producing affected pups, breeding of known carriers to each other is not recommended. Pembroke Welsh corgis that are not carriers of the mutation have no increased risk of having affected pups.

Information copied from Paw Print Genetics


EIC - Exercise-Induced Collapse:

Exercise-Induced Collapse (EIC) is an inherited neuromuscular disorder affecting Pembroke Welsh Corgis. EIC presents as exercise intolerance in apparently healthy dogs. Affected dogs are usually diagnosed before two years of age and appear normal during low to moderately strenuous activity. However, shortly after 5-20 minutes of strenuous exercise affected dogs will begin to walk with a wobbly, uncoordinated gait that often only affects the hind limbs. Dogs remain mentally alert and are not in pain during episodes of EIC. In some circumstances, the symptoms of EIC can progress to full body weakness with low muscle tone (flaccid paralysis), confusion, loss of consciousness, seizures and very rarely, death. The episodes typically last 5-10 minutes and most dogs will completely recover within 15-30 minutes.

Breed-Specific Information for the Pembroke Welsh Corgi

The Mutation of the DNM1 gene associated with exercise-induced collapse has been identified in the Pembroke Welsh Corgi. Though the exact frequency in the overall Pembroke Welsh Corgi population is unknown, 14% out of 94 Pembroke Welsh Corgis tested were carriers of the mutation and 2% were at-risk/affected.

Testing Tips

Genetic testing of the DNM1 gene in Pembroke Welsh Corgis will reliably determine whether a dog is a genetic Carrier of exercise-induced collapse. Exercise-Induced Collapse is inherited in an Autosomal Recessive manner in dogs meaning that they must receive two copies of the mutated gene (one from each parent) to develop the disease. In general, carrier dogs do not have features of the disease but when bred with another carrier of the same Mutation, there is a risk of having affected pups. Each pup that is born to this pairing has a 25% chance of inheriting the disease and a 50% chance of inheriting one copy and being a carrier of the DNM1 gene mutation. Reliable genetic testing is important for determining breeding practices. Because this mutation shows Variable Expressivity, genetic testing should be performed before breeding. In order to eliminate this mutation from breeding lines and to avoid the potential of producing affected pups, breeding of known carriers to each other is not recommended. Pembroke Welsh Corgis that are not carriers of the mutation have no increased risk of having affected pups.

Information copied from Paw Print Genetics


Von Willebrand Disease I (VWDI):

Von Willebrand Disease I (VWDI) is an inherited bleeding disorder affecting Pembroke Welsh Corgis. Dogs affected with VWDI have less than half of the normal level of von Willebrand coagulation factor (vWf), which is an essential protein needed for normal blood clotting. There is variability in the amount of vWf such that not all dogs with two copies of the Mutation are equally affected. Dogs that have less than 35% of the normal amount of vWf generally have mild to moderate signs of a bleeding disorder. Affected dogs may bruise easily, have frequent nosebleeds, bleed from the mouth when juvenile teeth are lost, and experience prolonged bleeding after surgery or trauma. Less often, the bleeding may be severe enough to cause death. Due to the variable severity of the disorder, affected dogs may not be identified until a surgery is performed or trauma occurs at which time excessive bleeding is noted. Veterinarians performing surgery on known affected dogs should have ready access to blood banked for transfusions. Most dogs will have a normal lifespan with this condition despite increased blood clotting times.

Breed-Specific Information for the Pembroke Welsh Corgi

The Mutation of the VWF gene associated with von Willebrand disease I has been identified in the Pembroke Welsh Corgi. Though the exact frequency in the overall Pembroke Welsh Corgi population is unknown, 37% of the Pembroke Welsh Corgis tested were carriers of the mutation and 6% were at-risk/affected.

Testing Tips

Genetic testing of the VWF gene in Pembroke Welsh Corgis will reliably determine whether a dog is a genetic Carrier of von Willebrand disease I. Von Willebrand Disease I is inherited in an Autosomal Recessive manner in dogs meaning that they must receive two copies of the mutated gene (one from each parent) to develop the disease. In general, carrier dogs rarely have features of the disease but when bred with another carrier of the same Mutation, there is a risk of having affected pups. Each pup that is born to this pairing has a 25% chance of inheriting the disease and a 50% chance of inheriting one copy and being a carrier of the VWF gene mutation. Reliable genetic testing is important for determining breeding practices. Because symptoms may be mild in affected dogs, genetic testing should be performed before breeding. In order to eliminate this mutation from breeding lines and to avoid the potential of producing affected pups, breeding of known carriers to each other is not recommended. Pembroke Welsh Corgis that are not carriers of the mutation have no increased risk of having affected pups.

Information copied from Paw Print Genetics


About Pembroke Welsh Corgi's


Country of Origin: 

The Pembroke Welsh Corgi descends from a crossbreeding of the Cardigan Welsh Corgi with either the Schipperke and Pomeranian or the Swedish Vallhund, which travelled to Wales with the Vikings. It is the smallest herding breed. ‘Cor gi’ translates to ‘dwarf dog’ or ‘gathering dog’ in Welsh; the rest of the Pembroke Welsh Corgi’s name comes from its birthplace of Pembrokeshire, Wales. Originally used as a hunter and guard dog, the Pembroke Welsh Corgi was later trained to herd cattle and sheep. The Pembroke Welsh Corgi was not used as a show dog until the 1920’s, and then met with only mild success. It was recognized as a distinct breed from the Cardigan Welsh Corgi in 1934, which led to a gradual increase in popularity. By 2006 the Pembroke Welsh Corgi had become the 22nd most registered breed with the American Kennel Club, far outnumbering the Cardigan variety. Famous Pembroke Welsh Corgis include ‘Ein’, the genius dog from anime ‘Cowboy Bebop’, and Stephen King's Pembroke Welsh Corgi ‘Marlowe’, who ‘Oy’ from ‘The Dark Tower’ series is based on. The Pembroke Welsh Corgi is also highly popular with British royalty; Queen Elizabeth II reportedly has more than a dozen pet Pembrokes.

Size: 

The Pembroke Welsh Corgi has a shoulder height of 25-30 cm (10-12 in) and weighs up to 15 kg (30 lbs); it is almost twice as long as it is tall. The Pembroke Welsh Corgi has a flat skull and large, high-set, erect, rounded ears. Pembroke Welsh Corgis have a docked or natural bob tail; the natural bob tail is coming more into fashion as some countries ban the practice of docking. The Pembroke Welsh Corgi is distinguished from the Cardigan Welsh Corgi by its smaller size, absence of a long tail, and generally more fox-like appearance.

Coat:

The Pembroke Welsh Corgi has a long, thick, water-resistant outer coat consisting of hard straight hairs, and a short undercoat. It can be red, sable, fawn, or black and tan, all with possible white markings on the legs, chest, muzzle, or blaze (vertical line between the eyes). White should not exceed 30 percent of the coat. The Pembroke Welsh Corgi may also have a ‘fairy saddle’ of hair on the shoulders pointing in a different direction to the rest of the coat.

Character:

The Pembroke Welsh Corgi is an energetic dog that bonds quickly with its family. It is brave, intelligent, alert, and self-confident. The Pembroke Welsh Corgi is slightly less aggressive and less boisterous than the Cardigan Welsh Corgi. It barks occasionally and makes a good watchdog.

Temperament:

Pembroke Welsh Corgis are good with children as long as they are respected; some tend to nip at the heels. Pembrokes can get along well with cats and other pets if socialized when young, but may not be fond of other dogs. The Pembroke Welsh Corgi is somewhat suspicious around strangers and must be trained not to growl. Pembroke Welsh Corgis can be domineering over one another.

Care: 

The Pembroke Welsh Corgi should be brushed occasionally to remove dead hairs, and bathed only when necessary. It has a life expectancy of 11-13 years. The Pembroke’s long body shape makes it susceptible to spinal problems and arthritis. Obesity in the Pembroke Welsh Corgi can lead to serious health conditions, so proper nutrition and exercise is critical. Another potential health problem for the Pembroke Welsh Corgi is Canine Degenerative Myelopathy, which may be present if the dog stands with its feet abnormally close together. The Pembroke Welsh Corgi can live outdoors but prefers to split its time between life indoors with the family and playtime in the yard.

Training: 

The intelligence of the Pembroke Welsh Corgi makes training fairly easy. Pembroke Welsh Corgis are eager learners and quickly understand what is expected of them. The Pembroke Welsh Corgi excels at dog sports such as sheepdog and agility trials. Its paws should be handled frequently when it is a puppy to help it overcome its natural resistance to paw grooming.

Activity: 

The Pembroke Welsh Corgi has an abundance of energy, requiring more exercise then its size indicates. Pembroke Welsh Corgis enjoy agility training and games of Frisbee catch. The Pembroke Welsh Corgi should not be made to jump from significant heights (even a few feet) or run for great distances because of its long back and short legs. It doesn’t mind apartment life as long as it is sufficiently exercised.


​ 

Dog and cat breeders are regulated by the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation, P.O. Box 12157, Austin, Texas 78711, 1-800-803-9202, 512-463-6599, www.tdlr.texas.gov

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